Stop and take a moment to take it all in. We are at the forefront of what will probably be considered one of the most important periods in visual media history. I know that’s a big statement to throw out there, but here is my evidence:

Amateur and student film makers (along with mom and dad), are able to create very nice looking, 4K videos from their iPhones/android devices like the Galaxy S6, allowing anyone to have access to pro-looking imagery. Before you haul me off to the guillotine, I of course understand not everyone knows lighting, framing, story telling, there’s audio to consider, acting, etc., however, the imaging capabilities of smart-devices certainly can’t be viewed as anything less than a benefit. As would be expected, many companies are creating added devices such as lens mounts, steady rigs, etc. to add to the arsenal of these aspiring amateurs to continue the education and practice of film making. All great things.

DJI has a similar modus operandi, giving amateur and professional film makers and videographers access to tools that enable shots that even five years ago, wouldn’t be possible outside a Hollywood budget. DJI’s line of drones and steady rigs are an “off-Broadway” dream, if I may. No longer do you need a huge, bulky steady cam and seasoned operator that you simply can’t afford. No longer do you need a helicopter for aerials. Obviously, DJI is not the only drone companies out there, but that’s who we went with, so that’s who I’ll reference. As previously mentioned, the X5 camera that goes with the Inspire now shoots 4K, and DJI recently released a new, hand held device that works with the X5 and acts as a steady cam. Enter the Osmo…

To be continued.

Written By

James Moore

James Moore is an associate producer at FiveSix Productions in Las Vegas, Nevada. He has a B.S. in Film from Full Sail University, and enjoys nature photography and script writing on the side.